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Post date: 11/12/2020 - 11:54

Christmas at the JAI is normally a time where we get together for our annual JAI festival, a gathering to celebrate the work of our young researchers. Obviously due to the ongoing chaos of the Covid-19 pandemic this year's meeting will not be able to be held in person and will, therefore, be held in an online Zoom-style meeting. The Indico page can be found by clicking this link!

The meeting is set to occur on FRIDAY DECEMBER 11TH 2020, with further details to be released soon!

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Post date: 11/12/2020 - 11:45

Professor Simon Hooker from the John Adams Institute at the University of Oxford has been awarded the Institute of Physics’ Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin Medal and Prize in recognition of his distinguished contributions to plasma physics

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Post date: 10/19/2020 - 15:28

We welcome Emily Archer, Pablo Arrutia Sota, Joseph Bateman and Cameron Robertson (L to R in the photo) who join us as D.Phil. students this October. As a sign of the times the traditional welcome drink was replaced by an autumnal distanced walk in the University Parks with JAI Director Phil Burrows. The JAI graduate course is being delivered remotely this term so the walk provided both fresh air and an opportunity for the Oxford team to catch up in person.

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Post date: 10/19/2020 - 11:39

As well as contributing to the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider, researchers at the JAI are helping to design its possible replacement. In a new paper, members of the JAI, working with researchers from CERN, have shown how the luminosity performance of the Compact Linear Accelerator could be significantly higher than its design target.

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Post date: 10/15/2020 - 19:56

Members of the John Adams Institute are working as part of a global effort to upgrade the largest physics experiment on Earth, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The upgrade to the LHC, known as the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), aims to vastly increase the number of collisions that occur in each of the four detectors allowing physicists to probe deeper into the origins of the universe.

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